1/1/14

Jul 23, 2014

mothernaturenetwork:

How to garden for bumblebeesCreating a bumblebee-friendly garden will help the struggling pollinators and be a boon for your blooms as well. http://www.mnn.com/your-home/organic-farming-gardening/stories/how-to-garden-for-bumblebees

mothernaturenetwork:

How to garden for bumblebees
Creating a bumblebee-friendly garden will help the struggling pollinators and be a boon for your blooms as well.

Jul 23, 2014

discoverynews:

Record-Setting Bug Is Bigger Than Your Hand

Creepy! http://news.discovery.com/animals/insects/record-setting-bug-is-bigger-than-your-hand-140723.htm

discoverynews:

Record-Setting Bug Is Bigger Than Your Hand

Creepy!

Jul 23, 2014

newmuseum:

Mohamed Larbi Rahali spent two years studying painting at the Art Academy in Tétouan, but his foremost passion has always been the sea. After leaving school, he worked in a range of occupations: as a carpenter, a boat mechanic, and, most frequently, as a fisherman. For Rahali, the return to his artistic practice in 1984 started with a tiny doodle on a discarded matchbox, but marked a major turning point in his life. He began to view matchboxes as miniature sketchbooks that could be salvaged from the sidewalk or collected from café patrons throughout the Tétouan medina.
Omri [My Life] (1984–ongoing) is on view as part of “Here and Elsewhere," an exhibition of contemporary from and about the Arab world on view through September 28.
Photo: Courtesy New Museum, New York. Photo: Benoit Pailley

newmuseum:

Mohamed Larbi Rahali spent two years studying painting at the Art Academy in Tétouan, but his foremost passion has always been the sea. After leaving school, he worked in a range of occupations: as a carpenter, a boat mechanic, and, most frequently, as a fisherman. For Rahali, the return to his artistic practice in 1984 started with a tiny doodle on a discarded matchbox, but marked a major turning point in his life. He began to view matchboxes as miniature sketchbooks that could be salvaged from the sidewalk or collected from café patrons throughout the Tétouan medina.

Omri [My Life] (1984–ongoing) is on view as part of “Here and Elsewhere," an exhibition of contemporary from and about the Arab world on view through September 28.

Photo: Courtesy New Museum, New York. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Jul 23, 2014

This is how alcohol looks under the microscope:

ajtechknow:

psychedelic-psychiatrist:

A company called Bevshots has produced a series of shots of booze under the microscope at the Florida State University’s chemistry labs.

Molecules at 1000x Magnification

Champagne:

image

Dry Martini:

image

Margarita:

image

Pina Colada:

image

Sake:

image

Scotch:

image

Tequila:

image

Vodka:

image

This is insanely cool, especially because we just remembered that this week’s TechKnow—a repeat of one of our favorite episodes—includes our first (and so far only) signature cocktail: bourbon poured over glacial ice

(Source: telegraph.co.uk)

Jul 23, 2014

mypubliclands:

usfwspacific:

Happy Batman Day! There may only be one “caped crusader”, but did you know there are about 1300 different kinds of bats worldwide? They may not be fighting crime, but they sure are busy making the world a better place by pollinating our crops and taking care of pesky insects.  
Bats live almost everywhere on Earth, except for the most extreme desert and polar regions. So chances are, there are bats where you live. Let’s meet a few of these superheroes of the nocturnal animal world in the Pacific Region.
Photo 1 - Marianas fruit bat: lives in Guam’s limestone forests and can have a wingspan of up to 3.5 feet! These gentle giants are important for pollinating and dispersing seeds of popular tropical fruits like coconut, papaya, and figs. Photo credit: Julia Boland/USFWS
Photo 2 - Townsend’s big-eared bat: Aptly named, their ears are over an inch long. That may seem small to you, but that’s a quarter of their entire body length! Can you imagine having ears almost a foot and a half long? Photo credit: Ann Froschauer/USFWS
Photo 3 - Pallid bats: Awesome listeners that use those big ears to detect the footsteps of their prey on the ground. Swooping in silently from above, these larger bats often eat scorpions and centipedes,crickets, grasshoppers and beetles.Photo credit: Ann Froschauer/USFWS
Photo 4: Spotted bats: Have the largest ears of any North American species, and those pearly pink ears and black and white spotted fur give it a very distinctive look. This bat also has one of the only echolocation calls that humans can hear. Photo credit: Paul Cryan
Photo 5: Hawaiian hoary bats: are the only land mammal native to the Hawaiian islands. The  ‘ope‘ape‘ as it’s called in Hawaii arrived on the islands some 10,000 years ago. That was quite a migration from North America, over 2,400 miles across the ocean! Photo credit: Paul Bonaccorso
Batty for bats? Check out these great resources: 
Bat Conservation International (bats worldwide) http://www.batcon.org/
Western Bat Working Group (bats in western North America) http://www.wbwg.org/


Love this Happy Batman Day post from our friends at USFWS!  And if these bats make you want more, check out our My Public Lands posts tagged “bats”!  http://mypubliclands.tumblr.com/tagged/bats

Jul 23, 2014

http://lawebloca.tumblr.com

(Source: lawebloca, via ftcreature)

Jul 23, 2014

neurosciencestuff:

Low Strength Brain Stimulation May Be Effective for Depression
Brain stimulation treatments, like electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), are often effective for the treatment of depression. Like antidepressant medications, however, they typically have a delayed onset. For example, a patient may receive several weeks of regular ECT treatments before a full response is achieved.
Thus, there is an impetus to develop antidepressant treatments that act to rapidly improve mood.
Low field magnetic stimulation (LFMS) is one such potential new treatment with rapid mood-elevating effects, as reported by researchers at Harvard Medical School and Weill Cornell Medical College.
"LFMS is unlike any current treatment. It uses magnetic fields that are a fraction of the strength but at higher frequency than the electromagnetic fields used in TMS and ECT," explained first author Dr. Michael Rohan.
Indeed, the potential antidepressant properties of LFMS were discovered accidentally, while researchers were conducting an imaging study in healthy volunteers. This led Rohan and his colleagues to conduct a preliminary study in which they identified the imaging parameters that seemed to be causing the antidepressant effect.
They then designed and constructed a portable LFMS device, which delivers a low strength, high frequency, electromagnetic field waveform to the brain. The next step was to test the device in depressed patients, the results of which are published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry.
A total of 63 currently depressed patients, diagnosed with either major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder, participated in the study and were randomized to receive a single 20-minute treatment of real LFMS or sham LFMS, where the device was on but the electromagnetic fields were inactive. Since neither the patients nor the researchers knew which treatment each person actually received, the true effect of the LFMS could be measured.
An immediate and substantial improvement in mood was observed in the patients who received real LFMS, compared to those who received the sham treatment. There were no reported side effects.
This finding suggests that LFMS may have the potential to provide immediate relief of depressed mood, perhaps even in emergency situations. It also confirms the success of the device’s design.
"The idea that weak electrical stimulation of the brain could produce beneficial effects on depression symptoms is somewhat surprising," said Dr. John Krystal, Editor of Biological Psychiatry. “Yet the data make a compelling case that this safe approach deserves further study.”
Rohan confirmed that additional research is underway to find the best parameters for LFMS use in the clinical treatment of depression. Further research will also be necessary to evaluate the effects of multiple compared to single treatments, and how long the antidepressant effects last following treatment.

neurosciencestuff:

Low Strength Brain Stimulation May Be Effective for Depression

Brain stimulation treatments, like electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), are often effective for the treatment of depression. Like antidepressant medications, however, they typically have a delayed onset. For example, a patient may receive several weeks of regular ECT treatments before a full response is achieved.

Thus, there is an impetus to develop antidepressant treatments that act to rapidly improve mood.

Low field magnetic stimulation (LFMS) is one such potential new treatment with rapid mood-elevating effects, as reported by researchers at Harvard Medical School and Weill Cornell Medical College.

"LFMS is unlike any current treatment. It uses magnetic fields that are a fraction of the strength but at higher frequency than the electromagnetic fields used in TMS and ECT," explained first author Dr. Michael Rohan.

Indeed, the potential antidepressant properties of LFMS were discovered accidentally, while researchers were conducting an imaging study in healthy volunteers. This led Rohan and his colleagues to conduct a preliminary study in which they identified the imaging parameters that seemed to be causing the antidepressant effect.

They then designed and constructed a portable LFMS device, which delivers a low strength, high frequency, electromagnetic field waveform to the brain. The next step was to test the device in depressed patients, the results of which are published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry.

A total of 63 currently depressed patients, diagnosed with either major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder, participated in the study and were randomized to receive a single 20-minute treatment of real LFMS or sham LFMS, where the device was on but the electromagnetic fields were inactive. Since neither the patients nor the researchers knew which treatment each person actually received, the true effect of the LFMS could be measured.

An immediate and substantial improvement in mood was observed in the patients who received real LFMS, compared to those who received the sham treatment. There were no reported side effects.

This finding suggests that LFMS may have the potential to provide immediate relief of depressed mood, perhaps even in emergency situations. It also confirms the success of the device’s design.

"The idea that weak electrical stimulation of the brain could produce beneficial effects on depression symptoms is somewhat surprising," said Dr. John Krystal, Editor of Biological Psychiatry. “Yet the data make a compelling case that this safe approach deserves further study.”

Rohan confirmed that additional research is underway to find the best parameters for LFMS use in the clinical treatment of depression. Further research will also be necessary to evaluate the effects of multiple compared to single treatments, and how long the antidepressant effects last following treatment.

Jul 23, 2014

No time to lose: New UNICEF data show need for urgent action on female genital mutilation and child marriage | Press centre | UNICEF

halftheskymovement:

The first ever Girl Summit is being held by UNICEF and the UK Government to rally support to end Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and child marriage. According to newly released data: “more than 130 million girls and women have experienced some form of FGM in the 29 countries in Africa and the Middle East where the harmful practice is most common.” 

"The numbers tells us we must accelerate our efforts," UNICEF Director, Anthony Lake said. "We can’t let the staggering numbers numbs us— they must compel us to act."

Jul 23, 2014

standwithpalestine:

A beautiful gesture from Lebanon - names of Palestinians killed by Israel in the last two weeks were hung on huge banners in Raouché, Beirut during a demonstration against the latest Zionist assault on Gaza, July 22, 2014. Protesters also threw flowers into the sea. Over 600 people have been killed (as of the morning of July 23, 2014), at least 25% of whom were children.

(Photos: Jamal Saidi / Reuters)

(via america-wakiewakie)

Jul 23, 2014

climateadaptation:

webofgoodnews:

This Pop-Up Solar Power Station Can Be Installed Instantly Anywhere In The World
At the push of a button, this shipping container instantly transforms into a pop-up solar power station: Hidden solar panels slide out of drawers on each side and immediately start generating energy wherever they’re needed, whether for disaster relief or in a remote village far off the grid.
—If that’s not good enough for you, then there’s also this:
The first model, released this month, includes onboard atmospheric water generators that pull water from the air. “We’re able to provide water without a water source,” says McGuire.
Read more

Interesting. I work in international development, and I can’t see who’d pay for these. Taxpayers? 
It seems the media loves them more than the markets. Diesel and gas generators are way waayyy cheaper. They’re produce more energy for more people in more places. They’re more accessible, easily repairable and replaceable, and are a more efficient response mechanism than a battery (solar panels charge a battery, then the battery is plugged into power station or some other distribution hub). In fact, many states already have long-term contracts with utilities to use the more reliable and time tested fossil fuel generator.

Utility power companies should consider using temporary power plants (coupled diesel or gas generators coupled, electric transformers with built-in power substation, fuel tanks and other power accessories) when no other possible alternative source of power generation, such as diesel-powered generators, is available to supplement the electricity shortfall during repairs and maintenance.
These plants can, for example, use a 100 MW rental power plant for six months to avoid power interruptions and continuously supply electricity to critical areas such as airports, data centers or hospitals… See here.

The fact that they’re dirty and pollutive does not trump their utility or world-wide acceptance.
I’d also point out that, as sexy as these units are, solar rental systems already exist. They’re used in the field by temporary construction crews, and possibly by disaster response teams (it’s unclear from their website), but their utility, availability, deployment times, maintenance and other costs are still unproven.
Finally, who is responsible for disposing the batteries?
http://www.fastcoexist.com/3032159/this-pop-up-solar-power-station-can-be-installed-instantly-anywhere-in-the-world

climateadaptation:

webofgoodnews:

This Pop-Up Solar Power Station Can Be Installed Instantly Anywhere In The World

At the push of a button, this shipping container instantly transforms into a pop-up solar power station: Hidden solar panels slide out of drawers on each side and immediately start generating energy wherever they’re needed, whether for disaster relief or in a remote village far off the grid.

—If that’s not good enough for you, then there’s also this:

The first model, released this month, includes onboard atmospheric water generators that pull water from the air. “We’re able to provide water without a water source,” says McGuire.

Read more

Interesting. I work in international development, and I can’t see who’d pay for these. Taxpayers? 

It seems the media loves them more than the markets. Diesel and gas generators are way waayyy cheaper. They’re produce more energy for more people in more places. They’re more accessible, easily repairable and replaceable, and are a more efficient response mechanism than a battery (solar panels charge a battery, then the battery is plugged into power station or some other distribution hub). In fact, many states already have long-term contracts with utilities to use the more reliable and time tested fossil fuel generator.

Utility power companies should consider using temporary power plants (coupled diesel or gas generators coupled, electric transformers with built-in power substation, fuel tanks and other power accessories) when no other possible alternative source of power generation, such as diesel-powered generators, is available to supplement the electricity shortfall during repairs and maintenance.

These plants can, for example, use a 100 MW rental power plant for six months to avoid power interruptions and continuously supply electricity to critical areas such as airports, data centers or hospitals… See here.

The fact that they’re dirty and pollutive does not trump their utility or world-wide acceptance.

I’d also point out that, as sexy as these units are, solar rental systems already exist. They’re used in the field by temporary construction crews, and possibly by disaster response teams (it’s unclear from their website), but their utility, availability, deployment times, maintenance and other costs are still unproven.

Finally, who is responsible for disposing the batteries?